Saturday, December 7, 2013

Nixon v. Administrator of General Services case brief

Nixon v. Administrator of General Services case brief summary
433 U.S. 425 (1977)

CASE SYNOPSIS
Appellant, former President, challenged an order from the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, which, under the Presidential Recordings and Materials Preservation Act, Pub. L. No. 93-526, §§ 104-5, directed an official of the Executive Branch to take custody of Presidential papers and tape recordings of appellant, and promulgate regulations to implement public access. Appellant challenged the constitutionality of the Act.

CASE FACTS
Appellant was ordered to turn over Presidential papers and tape recordings to an official of the Executive Branch under the Presidential Recordings and Materials Preservation Act (Act), Pub. L. No. 93-526, §§ 104-5, because the Act was facially constitutional. Appellant challenged the constitutionality of the Act.

DISCUSSION
  • The Court affirmed the order of the district court and limited the review to the consideration of injunctive relief against the facial unconstitutionality of the Act. 
  • The Court determined that the Act did not violate the separation of powers because nothing in the Act rendered it unduly disruptive of the Executive Branch. 
  • The Act did not violate the Presidential privilege doctrine. 
  • The Act did not unconstitutionally invade appellant's right of privacy as purely private information was to be returned to appellant. 
  • The Act did not significantly interfere with or chill appellant's First Amendment rights. 
  • Further, the Act did not violate the Bill of Attainder Clause because the Act did not rest upon a congressional determination of appellant's blameworthiness and desire to punish him.

CONCLUSION
The Court affirmed the order of the district court and, limiting review to the consideration of injunctive relief against the alleged facial unconstitutionality, held that appellant was to provide Presidential papers and tape recordings to an official of the Executive Branch. The Court determined that the Presidential Recordings and Materials Preservation Act was facially constitutional.

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