Monday, December 23, 2013

Taylor v. Kentucky case brief

Taylor v. Kentucky case brief summary
436 U.S. 478 (1978)

CASE SYNOPSIS
Petitioner, who was convicted of robbery, sought review of the judgment of conviction from the Kentucky Court of Appeals. Petitioner contended that he was entitled as a matter of due process under U.S. Constitutional Amendment XIV to instructions that he was presumed to be innocent and that his indictment was not evidence of guilt.

CASE FACTS
Petitioner, who was tried and convicted of robbery, appealed of the judgment. The issue raised on appeal was whether the Due Process Clause of U.S. Constitutional Amendment XIV required that either or both instructions be given upon timely defense motions.

DISCUSSION

  • On review, the Court held that the principle that there was a presumption of innocence in favor of the accused was the undoubted law, axiomatic and elementary, and its enforcement laid at the foundation of the administration of criminal law. 
  • The Court found that the trial court's refusal to give petitioner's requested instruction on the presumption of innocence resulted in a violation of his right to a fair trial as guaranteed by the Due Process Clause of U.S. Constitutional Amendment XIV
  • The conviction was reversed.
CONCLUSION
The judgment convicting petitioner of robbery was reversed because the trial court's refusal to give petitioner's requested instruction on the presumption of innocence resulted in a violation of his right to a fair trial as guaranteed by the Due Process Clause.

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